Archive for September, 2011

Child Trafficking digital library updates

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

Ten new documents on children on the move and migration have been added to the digital library of the Childtrafficking.com website. Here are just two, as described in a posting on the Childtrafficking listserv:

Global Movement for Children. (2010). Leaving Home: Voices of Children on the Move. 15 p. The report denounces the invisibility of children within international debates and immigration policies on the issue as well as the lack of adequate policies to address their specific needs. It voices their experiences on having left their homes and it analyses the wide array of causes and consequences that migration has for children beyond those who have been victims of criminal activities.”

Global Movement for Children. (2010). Protecting and Supporting Children on the Move. 37 p. The International Conference on Protecting and Supporting Children on the Move was held in Barcelona on 5-7 October 2010. It aimed at analysing and debating the current status of the issue of children on the move and presenting some key recommendations on the way forward to initiating the revision of policy and programmatic responses to the protection and support of these children. The Conference Report is expected to be a road map for topics of debate initiated at the Barcelona meetingwith a view to building national and international work agendas”.

Childtrafficking.com welcomes comments and suggestions and are interested to receive documents and research from the field. Contact childtrafficking.com@gmail.com.

Revisiting 40 years of multicultural policy in Canada

Monday, September 26th, 2011

The Association for Canadian Studies and the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association will host their 2nd Joint Annual Conference in Ottawa, Ontario from Sept 30-Oct 1, 2011 on the theme of Revisiting 40 Years of Multicultural Policy in Canada. Regrettably, there are few sessions related to the impact of multicultural policy on children. However, here is the preliminary program, fyi. I’ve included links to where I thought they might add value. Question to organizers: is there a hashtag for tweeps attending?

Fri Sept 30/11 9-10:30 am Concurrent sessions

Multiculturalism and the Social Network

Chair: Anne B. Denis, University of Ottawa

Tieja Thomas and Vivek Venkatesh, Concordia University, Digital media and immigration: Limits and possibilities.

Raluca Bejan, University of Toronto, A Step further: How to improve a mentoring program to fully advance the labour market inclusion of internationally trained professionals.

Ceta Ramkhalawansingh, City of Toronto (retired), By any name – From respect for cultural difference to re-distribution of wealth and status.

Carl  E. James, Danielle Lafond, Selom Chapman-Nyaho, York University, Getting to “know” police: Youth’s perceptions and experiences with police through summer employment.

Governance and Multiculturalism

Chair: Jean Teillet, Teillet and Associates

Augie Fleras, University of Waterloo, Rethinking multicultural governance in Canada: Toward a multiversal multiculturalism in  a globalizing world of  transmigration & transnationalism.

Malgorzata Kierylo Malolepsza, Queen’s University, Multiculturalism and the bureaucratization of ethnic consciousness.

Sinelka Jurkova, University of Calgary, Ethnic organizations – segregating or integrating effects?

Tara Gilkinson & Geneviève Sauvé, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Recent immigrants, earlier immigrants and the Canadian-born: Personal and social trust.

Zhang Jijiao, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Canadian multiculturalism policy: Experiences and lessons, and its implications to China.

Multiculturalism on the Prairies

Chair: Lloyd Wong, University of Calgary

David McGrane, University of Saskatchewan, Multiculturalism in Manitoba and Saskatchewan: An historical perspective.

Professor Emeritus Cornelius Jaenan, University of Ottawa, Belgian immigrants in western Canada.

Henry Chow, University of Regina, Bringing the world to Saskatchewan: Effects of national feelings, citizenship, and socio-political orientation on young Canadian adults.

Multiculturalism and National Identities

Sourayan Mookerjea, University of Alberta, Multiculturalism between empires.

Hijin Park, Brock University, Conceptualizing (Im) Migrant Asian women in multicultural Canada.

Pat McLane, University of Alberta, Canadian understandings of universalism and extremism.

Ashleigh Androsoff, University of Toronto, Immigration and identity in Canada’s insipient multicultural era: the Doukhobor case.

Friday, Sept 30/11 11-12:15 am/pm Concurrent sessions

Cities, Neighbourhoods and Multiculturalism

Heath McLeod, University of Calgary, Understanding unstable housing experiences of newcomer women in Calgary and Montreal – Considerations for policy.

Marilena Liguori & Bochra Manai, Institut national de la recherche scientifique – Centre Urbanisation, Culture et Société (Montréal), Multiculturalism in the city, reflections on ethnic neighbourhoods in Montreal and Toronto.

Cultural Multiculturalism

Chair: Sidd Bannerjee, Association for Canadian Studies

Melissa Templeton, University of California, Dance, race and national identity: Multiculturalism and federal support for Les Ballets Jazz.

Robert A. Kenedy, York University, Diasporic liminality from France to Montréal: Re-negotiating Jewish identity in intercultural and multicultural contexts.

Lloyd Sciban, University of Calgary, The Status of traditional Chinese medicine in Canada.

Rebecca Margolis, University of Ottawa, Yiddish and Canadian multiculturalism: A Marriage made in heaven?

Rethinking Multiculturalism: Tensions Between Ethnicity and Immigration

Chair: Judy Young Drache

Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, Immigration, integration & multiculturalism: Exploring the role of Chinese diasporic communities in Canada.

William Shaffir & Vic Satzewich, McMaster University, The informal settlement sector: Broadening the lens to understand newcomer integration in Hamilton.

Sinela Jurkova, University of Calgary, Ethnic organizations segregating or integrating effects?

Friday, Sept 30/11 1:45-3 pm Concurrent sessions

Slavic Marxists in Canada in the Twentieth Century

Chair: Christopher Adam, Carleton University

Mark Stolarik, University of Ottawa, Slovak Marxists in North America: Their hopes and disappointments.

Petryk Polec, University of Ottawa, The rise of Polish leftist culture in Canada.

Myron Momryk, Library and Archives Canada (retired), The Association of United Ukrainian Canadians and the ‘politics’ of multiculturalism.

Cultural Multiculturalism and Post-secondary Education

Janki Shankar and Eugene Ip, Norquest College, University of Calgary, Academic aspirations: Challenges and barriers of ethnic minority immigrant and indigenous students in a post-secondary education setting.

Dan Cui & Jennifer Kelly, University of Alberta, Too Asian? Media and multiculturalism from the Chinese Canadian youth perspective.

Multiculturalism Turns Forty: Reflections on the Impact of Multiculturalism

Chair: Susan Brigham, Mount St-Vincent University

Tamara Seiler, University of Calgary, Multiculturalism and the changing national imaginary: The Case of Canadian literature in English.

James Frideres, University of Calgary, Diasporas in society: Implications for Canada.

Lloyd Wong, University of Calgary, Anti-Multiculturalism and the implications for ethnic identity.

Madeline A. Kalbach, University of Calgary, The Impact of Canada’s multiculturalism policy and research data.

Research on Racialization and Racism at Canadian Universities: Preliminary Findings

Chair: Kamal Dib, Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Carl James, York University, Strategies of engagement:  Racialized faculty members Negotiation of the university.

Frances Henry and Carol Tator, York UniversityMarginalization, exclusion and omission:  The Experiences of racialized  faculty.

Ena Dua, University of Calgary, Measuring equity: The Politics of data collection.

Friday, Sept 30/11 3:30-5 pm Concurrent sessions

Multiculturalism and Ethnic Media

Chair: Sidd Bannerjee, Association for Canadian Studies

Augie Fleras, University of Waterloo, Ethnic media and multiculturalism in Canada: Partnership or opposition?

April Lindgren, Ryerson University, News that’s not fit to print? Portrayals of other ethnic and racialized groups in the Greater Toronto Area’s ethnocultural newspaper.

Multiculturalism and Education

Johanne J. Jean-Pierre, McMaster University and Fernando Nunes, Mount Saint Vincent University, Multiculturalism policy turns 40: Reflections on its impact on education.

Sarah Smith, Université de Montréal, The Multicultural textbook and the coloniality of difference.

Thomas Ricentro, University of Calgary, Multiculturalism and the monoglot ideology: Incommensurate worlds?

Unpacking Multiculturalism in the Classroom

Ratna Ghosh, Mariusz Galczynski, and Vilelmini Tsagkaraki, McGill University, Unpacking multiculturalism in the classroom.

Religion and Multiculturalism in Canada: 40 Years Later

Chair: Kamal Dib, Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Paul Bramadat, University of Victoria, Back to the future: Canadian approaches to recent and anticipated controversies involving religion.

Lori Beaman, University of Ottawa, Beyond accommodation: Multiculturalism and deep equality.

Benjamin Berger, Osgoode HallYork University, Trying religion: Multiculturalism, religion and law in Canada.

Solange Lefebvre, Université de Montréal, After Bouchard-Taylor: Religion and interculturalism in Quebec.

David Seljak, University of Waterloo, Christianity, citizenship and multiculturalism norms in a post-secular society.

Taking the Nation to Task: Reflecting on the Cultural Dimensions of Multiculturalism

Carrianne Leung, Ontario College of Art and Design, The Passage of fortune: Writing heritage, history and race in the nation.

Lynn Caldwell, University of Saskatchewan, Static possibility: Race, nostalgia, and Saskatchewan as a national space.

Sam Tecle, York University, I’m not Black, I’m Eritrean: Being Eritrean/learning Blackness.

Meaghan Frauts, Queen’s University, Canada’s racialized spaces: The Politics of race and temporality of space during National Aboriginal Day.

Nouveau arrivants et intérgration scolaire en milieu linguistic et culturel minoritaire au Manitoba

Nathalie Piquemal, University of Manitoba

Boniface Bahi, Faculté Saint Jean – University of Alberta

Mahsa Bakshaei, Université de Montréal, La politique canadienne de multiculturalisme assure-t-elle l’égalité de chance de la réussite scolaire des élèves immigrants au secondaire québécois ? Le cas des élèves sud-asiatiques au secteur français.

Sat Oct 1/11 9-10:30 am Concurrent sessions

Black Canada and Multiculturalism: After Colonialty

Rinaldo Walcott, OISE – University of Toronto

Andrea Fatona, Ontario College of Art and Design

Katherine McKittrick, Queen’s University

Mark Campbell, University of Guelph

The Evolving Practice of Multiculturalism: from Food and Drink to Social Transformation

Chair: Ceta Ramkhalawansingh, Former Corporate Diversity Manager, City of Toronto (retired)

Herman Ellis Jr, Program Director, Scadding Court Community Centre

Antoni Shelton, Co-ordinator of Operations, Canadian Union of Public Employees Ontario

Linda Koehler-Moore, Supervisor, Toronto Parks Forestry and Recreation

André Goh, Manager, Diversity Management Unit, Toronto Police

Nadira Pattison, Manager, Arts Services, Toronto Culture

Immigrant Social and Political Participation

Chair: Phil Ryan, Carleton University

Philippe Couton, University of Ottawa, The Immigrant third sector: Recent evidence.

Marie-Michele Sauvageau, University of Ottawa, Immigrant political activism in Quebec.

Halyna Mokrushyna, University of Ottawa, Social and political engagement in the Ukrainian diaspora.

Mixed Race and Identity

Chair: Minelle Mahtani, University of Toronto

Danielle Lafond, York University

Leanne Taylor, Brock University

Karina Vernon, University of Toronto

Renisa Mawani, University of British Columbia

Sat Oct 1 11-12:15 am/pm Concurrent sessions

Multiculturalism and Suspect Minorities: Possibilities of Conflicting Identities

Chair: Lori Wilkinson, University of Manitoba

Kalyani Thurairajah, McGill University, Tamils in Canada and Sri Lanka: Competing identities and loyalties in the shadow of terrorism.

Morton Weinfeld, McGill University, Competing identities and loyalties among Canadian and British Jews.

Interculturalism

Chair: Susan Brigham, Mount St-Vincent University

Celine Cooper, OISE – University of Toronto, The Rise of interculturalism in Quebec: How can the emergent approach to language, identity, ethno-cultural diversity and social integration in Quebec help us reflect upon multiculturalism and forms of nationalism(s) in Canada?

Darryl Lerroux, Saint Mary’s University, considering Quebec’s interculturalism as a response to multiculturalism.

Author Meets Critics: Us, Them and Others: Pluralism and National Identity in Diverse Societies

Chair: Minelle Mahtani, University of Toronto

Elke Winter, University of Ottawa

Catherine Frost, McMaster University

Harold Ramos, Dalhousie University

Leslie Seidle, Institute for Research on Public Policy

Youth, Generational Issues and Multiculturalism

Chair: Kamal Dib, Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Emanuel de Silva, University of Toronto, Making and Masking Difference: Multiculturalism and sociolinguistic tensions in Toronto’s Portuguese-Canadian market.

Yunliang Meng, York University, A Spatial and temporal analysis of  youth’s socioeconomic outcomes in ethnic enclaves in Toronto.

Fernando Mata, Canadian Heritage, Prevalence and generational persistence of lone parent status among ethnic groups in Canada: A Look at census data.

Sat Oct 1/11 1:45-3:30 pm Concurrent sessions

Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Canadian Identity

Multiculturalism has been a cornerstone of Canadian society for 40 years. It is premised on the concept that all citizens are equal, and they can maintain their identities, take pride in their ancestry and do so without undercutting their sense of belonging to Canada.  Public opinion surveys generally reveal that Canadians are supportive of the principle of multiculturalism.  However the nature and depth of this support is often the object of debate. Also there is often some uncertainty around how the theory of multiculturalism is applied when it comes to issues of human rights and discrimination.

This panel discusses the impact of multiculturalism on human rights from the perspectives of four institutional champions of Canadian human rights. More specifically, the panel will  address: the relationship between multiculturalism and human rights; the difference between multiculturalism and interculturalism; how to accommodate multiculturalism within a framework of common values.

Chair: Ayman Al-Yassini, Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Gaetan Cousineau, Commission des droits de la personne et de la jeunesse, Québec

Judge David M. Arnot, Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission

Barbara Hall, Ontario Human Rights Commission

Maxwell Yalden, former diplomat and senior public servant, and author

Challenges of Multicultural Discourse

Chair: Kamal Dib, Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Elke Winter, & Marie-Michele Sauvageau, University of Ottawa, How to recast national identity and on whose terms? Media representation of the new Canadian citizenship guide.

Chedly Belkhodja, Université de Moncton, La critique du multiculturalism ou Québec: les nouveau intellectuels de droite.

Karen Bird, McMaster University, WTF is the ethnic vote? Critical reflections on multiculturalism and electoral politics in Canada.

Dominique Riviere, OISE – University of Toronto, Scratching our “Great National Itch”:  narratives of multiculturalism in 12st-century Canada.

Multiculturalism and Immigrant Integration: The Experience of Smaller Cities and Rural Areas

Chair: Howard Ramos, Dalhouise University

Lori Wilkinson, University of Manitoba, An Examination of identity and experiences of discrimination among newcomer youth living in mid-sized Canadian cities.

Evangelia Tastsoglou and Sandy Petrinioti, Saint Mary’s University, Does ‘place’ matter? multiculturalism and the forging of identities by Lebanese youth in Halifax.

Madine VanderPlaat, Saint Mary’s University, The Role of family in the decision to migrate and settle.

Multiculturalism and Mental Health

Chair: Nehal El-Hadi, University of Toronto

Avril Aves, Multicultural Outreach, KW Counselling Services, Kitchener, Ontario, Multiculturalism and Mental Health: An Outreach strategy for counselling agencies.

Professor Emeritus John Berry, Queen’s University, Intercultural relations in plural societies: Research derived from multicultural policy.

Examining Multiculturalism, Ethnic Identity and Intercultural Communication Competence Through the Social Construction of Food

Jaya Peruvemba, University of Ottawa, Examining multiculturalism, ethnic identity and intercultural communication competence through the social construction of food

Sat Oct 1/11 3:30-5 pm Concurrent sessions

Multiculturalism and immigrant Integration: The Experience of Smaller Cities and Rural Areas II

Chair: Evangelia Tastsoglou, Saint Mary’s University

Laura Lee Howard, University of Prince Edward Island, Reaching out and welcoming in: Increasing newcomer parental engagement in the Garden of the Gulf (PEI).

Yoko Yoshida and Howard Ramos, Dalhousie University, Who are rural immigrants?

Ather Akbari, Saint Mary’s University, Economic integration of immigrants in small urban centres: Some evidence from Atlantic Canada.

Susan Brigham, Mount St Vincent University, Talking back to Canada’s multicultural policy: Internationally educated teachers’ negotiation of space, place, identity and belonging in Maritime Canada.

Ethnic Communities and the Creation of Canada’s Multicultural Policy

Ethnic communities were instrumental in creating Canada’s Multiculturalism Policy. Their contribution in the development of the policy is not well known or documented. Representatives of ethnocultural organizations appeared before the Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism pointing out that many Canadians who helped build the country were of non-French and non-English origin: hence, the implementation of ”A Policy of Multiculturalism within a Bilingual Framework.” The panel will provide an opportunity for members of the Canadian Ethnocultural Council and representatives of community organizations to reflect on the development of the policy over the past 40 years, reflecting how it has shaped the role of ethnic organizations, been an instrument for social cohesion, and has facilitated nation building while strengthening Canadian identity.

Chair: Anna Chiappa, Canadian Ethnocultural Council

Can Le, Vietnamese Federation of Canada

Gita Nurlaila, Indonesian Canadian Congress

Diane Dragasevich, Serbian National Shield Society of Canada

C. Lloyd Stanford, Le Groupe Stanford Inc.

Author Meets Critics: Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity, and the National Imaginary

Chair: Minelle Mahtani, University of Toronto

Margot Francis, Brock University

Renisa Mawani, University of British Columbia

Rinaldo Walcott, University of Toronto

Jeff Thomas, Independent Photographer and Curator

Developing and Measuring Effectiveness of Cultural Intelligence and Diversity in the Canadian Forces: Challenges and Considerations

Chair: Karen Davis, National Defence Canada

Jack Jedwab, Association for Canadian Studies

Daniel Lagacé-Roy, Royal Military College

John Berry, Queen’s University

Lloyd Wong, University of Calgary

The Wellbeing of immigrant children and parents in Canada depends much on a sense of belonging

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Economists Peter Burton and Shelley Phipps, Dalhousie University studied the life satisfaction of youth who immigrated to Canada as children and their immigrant parents. They used data on thousands of recent immigrants and Canadian-born families collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey (2002-2008).

In their working paper “The Well-Being of Immigrant Children and Parents in Canada“, Burton and Phipps find less life satisfaction than Canadian born families with youth.

From the news item covering the release of the paper in today’s Globe and Mail by Frances Woolley:

“Immigrants felt less of a sense of belonging than the Canadian-born. For youth, feeling like you don’t belong is a better predictor of being less satisfied with life than being an immigrant. Indeed, once Burton and Phipps controlled for people’s sense of belonging, the gap between immigrant and comparable non-immigrant youth went away. (That was not true for parents, however — even immigrant parents who felt like they belonged to their local communities were still less satisfied than non-immigrants)”.

immigrantchildren.ca on arrival to its 500th post!

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

the-arrival

immigrantchildren.ca is approaching its 500th entry! To celebrate, we’re having a contest. If you have ever commented to any post on immigrantchildren.ca since the launch in November 2007, you are eligible to win a copy of Shaun Tan’s The Arrival.

All you need to do is add a comment responding to the question What do you think best supports the settlement needs of young children (birth to age eight)?

Is it high quality, early learning and child care?

Is it ensuring that settlement services promote and support home languages?

Are social/recreational programs the best way to facilitate very young immigrant children’s integration into Canadian society?

Is it a family-oriented approach, involving all members of the child’s family in programming/activities? Like what?

Or, something else? Let us know!

Post your responses and comments to this blog entry and I will randomly draw a winner two days after the date of my 500th post, and send off a copy of Shaun Tan’s beautiful book (via Canada Post).

Contest opens now! Don’t delay; reply with your comments today.

Call for papers: Mothers and mothering in a global context

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

The Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI) and the Institute for Gender and Development Studies: The Nita Barrow Unit, University of the West Indies are hosting an international conference on: Mothers and Mothering in a Global Context, Feb 24-25, 2012 in Barbados.

From their call for papers:

“This conference explores motherhood and mothering in a global context by highlighting the commonality and also the diversity in how mothers care for children and others across, and beyond, borders and cultures. We welcome submissions from researchers, students, activists, community workers, artists and writers and papers that explore the meaning and experience of motherhood in a global context from all academic disciplines including but not limited to motherhood studies, anthropology, history, literature, popular culture, women’s studies, sociology, and that consider the theme across a wide range of maternal identities including racial, ethnic, regional, religious, national, social, cultural, political, and sexual. Cross-cultural perspectives on the subject matter are particularly welcome.

Deadline for submissions is Nov 15, 2011. For more information, visit the MIRCI website.

Children’s rights Wiki from Child Rights International Network (CRIN)

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Child Rights International Network (CRIN) has launched today a child rights wiki. From their announcement:

“Today, CRIN is launching a “Children’s Rights Wiki” to bring together all information about children’s rights in one place. The aim of the project – which is in the style of a Wikipedia – is to make the large volume of information that exists on children’s rights more accessible, to highlight persistent violations and inspire collective action. Much of the information in the new Wiki is already available on the CRIN website.

“See the Wiki here: Initially the Wiki is beginning with 41 country pages, with more to follow. They are:

Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Colombia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, Egypt, El Salvador, Finland, Grenada, Guatemala, Japan, Lao, Macedonia, Yogoslav Republic, Mongolia, Montenegro, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Serbia, Singapore, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tajikstan, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Yemen”.

The Wiki is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project – CRIN welcomes comments or suggestions to info@crin.org.

Sept 26th is European Day of Languages

Monday, September 19th, 2011

From the website:

“At the initiative of the Council of Europe, Strasbourg, the European Day of Languages has been celebrated every year since 2001 on 26 September. Throughout Europe, 800 million Europeans represented in the Council of Europe‘s 47 member states are encouraged to learn more languages, at any age, in and out of school. Being convinced that linguistic diversity is a tool for achieving greater intercultural understanding and a key element in the rich cultural heritage of our continent, the Council of Europe promotes plurilingualism in the whole of Europe”.

ANCIE Sept bulletin on international students

Saturday, September 17th, 2011

Home

AMSSA – The Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Services of BC also manages the AMSSA Newcomer Information Exchange (ANCIE) and releases a quarterly e-Bulletin on a number of topics related to newcomer children.

The September 2011 bulletin is on international students; students who are in Canada on a visa or as a refugee claimant. The bulletin examines why international students come to Canada, shares perspectives from business and teachers, and provides information on how to support international students as they navigate their way through the BC school system. (Information is relevant and applicable across jurisdictions).

Visit the ANCIE page to learn how to subscribe.

Good child care is a barrier identified in Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) report

Thursday, September 15th, 2011

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has released a report today on the barriers to immigrant integration. A brief quote from the report/website:

“Municipalities are the front-line, first-responders for many immigrants´ needs, yet we collect just eight cents of every tax-dollar paid in Canada and have been given no formal role in developing federal immigration policies and programs,” said FCM vice-president Claude Dauphin. “The federal government must recognize municipalities as key partners in immigrant settlement and work with us to tailor solutions to local needs.”

“FCM called on the federal government to protect long-term investments in communities, including more than $500 million in annual housing investments scheduled to expire during the next decade; protect and build on recent investments in Canada’s infrastructure and public transit; work with municipalities, provinces and territories to design longer-term settlement programs that respond better to changing local needs; and collect data on immigrants´ needs and report back to Canadians on the results”.

Among the main findings of the FCM report is the need to provide more and better ESL clasess for parents, alongside afffordable, accessible child care.

Read the full report here.

Call for papers: Restructuring refuge and settlement: Responding to the global dynamics of displacement

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

The Centre for Refugee Studies at York University hosts the 2012 Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) conference May 16-18th at York U, Toronto.

From the call for papers: “The 2012 CARFMS conference will bring together researchers, policymakers, displaced persons and advocates from diverse disciplinary and regional backgrounds to discuss the issue of restructuring refuge and settlement witha view to better understanding how migration policies, processes andstructures responds to the global dynamics of displacement. We inviteparticipants from a wide range of perspectives to explore the practical,experiential, policy-oriented, legal and theoretical questions raised byrefuge and settlement at the local, national, regional and internationallevels. The conference will feature keynote and plenary speeches fromleaders in the field, and we welcome proposals for individual papers andorganized panels structured around the following broad subthemes:

Restructuring settlement: Local, national, comparative and international issues and concerns

States utilitarian approach towards migration challenges the balancebetween the objective of economic development, on the one hand, and integration and equal treatment of migrants, on the other. Recent changes inthe selection of migrant workers have negative consequences on social cohesion. Settlement, adaptation and integration policies play an importantrole at local, national and international levels to address this situationand prevent exclusion: What are the strengths and the weaknesses ofsettlement policies? How should these policies be adapted to meet the needsof increasing numbers of temporary workers? How can actors promote a process of integration that fosters social cohesion? What is the role played by local and national authorities, employers and members of civil society? How to ensure coherence and coordination between various actors dealing with issues such as health, education, social welfare, employment and law enforcement? What are particular legal, social, economic needs of different groups of migrants? How does gender, age, ability, race and other factors affect settlement? What are the best settlement practices?

Restructuring refuge: Local, national, comparative and international issues and concerns

The recent reform of the Canadian asylum system aims at accelerating the refugee status determination process and reducing the number of asylum claims by making the system less attractive. In North America, the United States and Canada cooperate to stem ‘unwanted’ migration. Similar developments can be observed in other parts of the world. Critical analysis of recent trends and developments contributes to a better understanding of current challenges: How do local, regional and international mechanisms and logics transform political and media discourse, norms, policies and practices related to forced migrants? What are the changes in institutional and procedural arrangements to deal with refugee and asylum claims? How do these changes affect protection norms and policies at the local, national and international level? How do international and local actors, institutions and agencies promote the legal, economic and social inclusion of forced migrants?

Restructuring settlement and refuge:  New approaches and theories

Innovative approaches and theories developed within traditional disciplines or in interdisciplinary lines foster knowledge on current norms, policies and practices linked to questions of settlement and refuge. New theoretical, conceptual, methodological issues from diverse critical and institutional perspectives highlight these questions, including: the link between refuge and security in an era of globalization; the impact of restrictive regulation of the freedom of movement of forced migrants; the need to redefine policies of resettlement, adaptation, and integration of immigrants and refugees in a context of changing migration figures; the adaptation of settlement policies to promote social inclusion of low-skilled temporary workers, asylum seekers and irregular migrants; settlement and citizenship.

Individuals wishing to present a paper at the conference must submit a250-word abstract and 100-word biography by December 30, 2011. The conference organizers welcome submissions of both individual papers and proposals for panels. Please submit your abstract via the conference website. For more information, please contact Michele Millard at mmillard@yorku.ca”.

Honoring the Child, Honoring Equity: Inspiring change(s): insights, challenges, hopes and actions

Monday, September 12th, 2011

The program for the November 2011 Honoring the Child, Honoring Equity conference, hosted by the Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne, has been posted (with updates promised as they become available – and full and final conference program by November, 2011). The conference website includes a few sessions related to diversity and integration, including the following, but it also addresses diversity from the broadest perspective and examines everything from working with children with disAbilities, politics and more. Worth bookmarking to see the scope of the sessions being offered.

Nicola Surtees, University of Cantebury, gives a paper exploring “privilege and silence with respect to family diversity, equity and inclusion in early childhood education. … challenges the primacy of the nuclear family model as a benchmark for families calling for ways of thinking and talking about forms of kinship that open up possibilities for all families”.

Follow developments of the 2011 Honoring the Child, Honoring Equity conference at the conference website.

Rainbow Caterpillar writing award for children’s books written in mother languages

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

Toronto, Ontario, September 6th 2011 – Rainbow Caterpillar is proud to launch the Rainbow Caterpillar Award for Writing for Children to support writers who write in their mother languages.  The Award will be awarded to the best story written by a Canadian citizen (or resident) in a language other than French or English.

“By encouraging writers to write in their mother language, we want to help create a vibrant literary production for children in foreign languages, but with a uniquely Canadian perspective,” says Happie Testa, co-owner of Rainbow Caterpillar Bookstore.

Submissions are due on October 6th. Guildelines will be available online at Rainbow Caterpillar .

“We hope ultimately this award also helps parents pass their mother language on to their children born or raised in Canada,” says Hanoosh Abbasi, co-owner of Rainbow Caterpillar. “We feel that it is important for parents to have access to good books from their countries of origin, but also to put their ancestral culture in the context of our shared Canadian culture where many people speak more than one language on a daily basis.”

The Award will be presented in conjunction with the Canadian Ethnic Media Association (CEMA) at the Association’s own 33rd Annual Awards Gala. CEMA is an organization dedicated to the promotion and preservation of the value to Canada of the ethnic media in creating an understanding of Canada and Canadian citizenship, and the retention of cultural links with countries of origin.

For more information, contact Happie Testa at 647-975-8800 or happie@rainbowcaterpillar.ca.