Archive for 2012

Building our capacity to support transitions of immigrant/refugee children and youth

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

BCs Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies (AMSSA) have released a report post their provincial learning exchange on the topic of Building capacity to support transitions of immigrant and refugee children and youth held this summer.

There were several goals for the event:

- to create opportunities for learning about current and emerging research and best practices

- to increase the skills, knowledge and practice of service providers who work with immigrant and refugee children and youth

- for networking, learning from each other and meeting new colleagues

- to re-energize and develop synergy amongst the different sub-sectors

- to identify emerging issues and priorities for future work and development.

The report includes background, goals and overviews and discusses what is called three big ideas for serving newcomer children and youth: Settlement, culture, and readiness.

Webinar: Alternative care and safe accommodation for trafficked children

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

The Child Recovery and Reintegration Network will hold a webinar on Alternative care and safe accommodation: What are we learning about alternative care for children generally and what does ‘safe accommodation’ for trafficked children look like.

The webinar will be held on Wednesday November 14, 2012, 3pm (London time).

The webinar will include presentations from:

For more information about the webinar please email nicole.mccloy@perth.uhi.ac.uk

Call for papers ~ Growing up global: Childhoods in a transnational context

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Announcing a joint session of the Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCY) and the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) to be held at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC June 1-8, 2013.

From the call for papers:

“As people and institutions connect across the borders of nation-states, children are invariably part of the processes of transnationalism. Yet their presence has largely been ignored by much of the scholarship on transnationalism. While they may lack the abilities to fully articulate and engage with the social, political, and economic forces behind transnational movement and circulation, young people are just as affected by – and central to – these global currents. Thinking about childhood in a transnational context requires a greater awareness of how contemporary global culture is creating a unique experience of childhood itself, both of childhood, and for children themselves.

“The purpose of this panel is to put children and childhood at the center of discussions concerning transnationalism. We seek papers that investigate the ways in which ‘the child’ both impacts and is impacted by circulation across global borders. We encourage research that questions how children experience transnationality and how we understand the child and childhood in the context of nation states whose borders are not what they once were.

“Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

-researching children and childhoods in transnational contexts
-the experiences of children in the transnational context
-the relationships between global capital and the transnational child
-securitization and the transnational child
-children in transnational families
-cosmopolitanism and the transnational child
-transnational migration and the child”.

Deadline is November 1, 2012.

For more information, visit the ACCUTE C4P page.

Papers, the book

Sunday, October 21st, 2012

immigrantchildren.ca reviewed the documentary Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth two years ago. It is a provocative and moving piece depicting the triumphs and challenges faced by undocumented youth in the US. Now, Papers, the book has been released. From the announcement:

“Papers the Book is here!! Order your copy today!

“This beautiful book includes 30 stories by undocumented youth and is illustrated with color drawings by undocumented artist Julio Salgado.

“These moving and inspiring stories were written by young people who range in age from 10 to 32. They were born in countries throughout the world and raised in the United States. The writers sent these stories to Graham Street Productions during the production of the documentary film Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth.

“For bulk and educational orders of this book, please contact us at info@grahamstreetproductions.com or 503-282-8683.

“For press inquiries or for a review copy, please contact us at
info@grahamstreetproductions.com or 503-282-8683″.

There is no one undocumented experience. Some of our parents crossed the border without authorization, some of us came here legally and overstayed visas, some of us were escaping persecution while some came seeking more prosperity. We are from all over the world. But somewhere in all our stories, there is a common thread: there is an act of love.
– Prerna Lal, Undocumented and Unafraid

Undocumented youth have been the leaders of a cultural transformation that has swept the country, making huge gains for the immigrant rights movement. Unapologetic and unafraid, they are writing their own history and establishing new rules in the game.
– Favianna Rodriguez, artist and co-editor of Reproduce & Revolt

In the dawn of the 21st century, undocumented youth are a living testament to what is enduring about the American spirit.
– Jose Antonio Vargas, award-winning journalist and founder of Define American

Mothercraft’s “Caring for Canada’s Children” online training project

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Caring for Canada’s Children was an online training event offered by Mothercraft 2009-2010, and can be found archived on the Mothercraft website.

Funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Mothercraft offered Caring for Canada’s Children training course for settlement workers and other professionals working with newcomer families and children from birth to age six. The two-year online training program covered many topics, including:

The effects of migration policy on family reorganization

Adaptations to parenting: Healthy family functioning

The Challenges to cultural and geographic dislocation

The global worker: Cultural competence in the settlement sector.

Mothercraft is seeking renewed funding to support updated training to include a training manual and future professional training.

If you participated in Mothercraft’s Caring for Canada’s Children, and have feedback, please respond to the following questions via email to Cindy Kwan at ckwan@mothercraft.org .

1.  Since the Caring for Canada’s Children training, have you found the information useful in your professional work?

2. Would you be interested in a more thorough updated training manual focused on newcomer families: issues for families with infants and young children under six years of age?

3.  Please share a quick comment with us about the Caring for Canada’s Children training and its use in your professional work.

Responses are due by Friday, August 24, 2012

Call for papers: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

The International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care is (from their website) “a multidisciplinary journal focusing on international migration. The journal’s focus includes coverage of labour migration, asylum seekers, refugees and undocumented migrants, with an emphasis on health and social care and mental health issues.

“The following themes are of particular interest to the journal:
- Health care of migrants and refugees
- Impact of displacement on health and social care needs
- Treatment of refugee children
- Impact of family separation
- Human trafficking
- Integration of migrants and refugees”.

Submissions should be sent to the Editor, Professor Charles Watters at charles.watters@rutgers.edu

Author Guidelines.

CIC call for proposals for settlement and resettlement programs

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

Citizenship and Immigration Canada has issued a call for papers for the provision of settlement and resettlement projects that are local, regional, national and international in scope.

Related documents:

National call for proposals

Funding guidelines

FAQs

This call for settlement and resettlement projects includes mention of a new model of what used to called “childminding”. The new model is now called Care for Newcomer Children (CNC). Information is available on the CMAS website on the CNC model, including:

Care for Newcomer Children: Highlights

Care for Newcomer Children Bulletin

Care for Newcomer Children: Questions & Answers

For more information on the CIC call, and to ask questions, contact CFP2012@cic.gc.ca. Deadline is Sept 7, 2012.

On new shores immigrant children conference, 2012

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

The program for the 2012 On New Shores: Understanding Immigrant Children and Youth (ONS) conference is now available.

The theme this year is Social Support and Capital: Happiness in Immigrant Families.

The 5th ONS conference will be held October 25-26 in downtown Toronto at two venues: The Ryerson Centre for Immigration Studies (RCIS) and the Downtown Holiday Inn.

Attached is the ONS 2012 program, but here are some highlights:

DAY ONE

Opening keynote is by Fons Van De Vijver, Tilburg University, The Netherlands, on the topic of Identity and Well-Being in Immigrants

Ethnic Identity and Acculturation of Turkish-Bulgarian Youth: Evidence from Self and Parents Reports, with R. Dimitrova, A. Chasiotis, et al., Tilburg University et al., The Netherlands

Acculturation in 3D: Psychological Assets and Liabilities of Black Jamaican Immigrants in the United States, G. Ferguson, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, US

Immigrant Mothers’ Interactions with their Children’s Teachers, Mehru Ali, Ryerson University

Welcoming All Voices: Building Inclusive Parent Groups in Schools, M. Abbott, London Middlesex Local Immigration Partnership

DAY TWO

Social Support in the Lives of Russian Immigrant and Sudanese Refugee Men as Fathers in Canada, David Este, University of Calgary

Communication Brokering in Immigrant Families: Avenues for New Research, Vappu Tyyska, Ryerson University

Social Support Systems at Play for Newcomer Youth E. Ghassemi & T. Velox, Newcomer Centre of Peel

Closing keynote is by Dr. Ross Parke, Wellesley, on Future Directions

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Connecting immigrant children to the outdoors, Alka Burman, Region of Peel

Resilience of Colombian immigrant youth living in Canada, M. Cabal Garces & S. Chuang, University of Guelph

Welcoming newcomer children and families: Understanding “Three Big Ideas” – settlement, culture and readiness, Judith Colbert

Depressive symptoms of Italian immigrant children and parents, R. Dimitrova, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

When support is left behind: Experiences of lone immigrants in Canada, B. Martin, Ryerson University

Chinese adoptees in Canada: The Role of policy and parents in facilitating transnationalism, M. Symington, Ryerson University

ONS 2012 Registration form.

See highlights from the 4th ONS conference: Resilience of immigrants – Coping with stress in various cultural contexts.

Call for papers: Honour/shame related violence in Canada

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Amina Jamal, Mandeep Kaur Mucina and Farrah Khan are planning a symposium and edited collection of (as posted on website of the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall) “critical essays on “honour” related violence. The idea for this anthology emerged initially in reaction to the murder of Aqsa Parvez and the responses of various institution and communities. As other murders of young women come to light in Canada, such as Amandeep Atwal, Jassi Sidhu, Zainab, Sahar and Geeti Shafia, we find that there are limited spaces for us to mourn and reflect on the complexities of these murders.

“Often the reactions of mainstream society and the questions posed to us are the following: is violence endemic to South Asian communities? Do some religions condone “honour “based killings? Reacting to the death and to the responses, the following questions became a central focus for our work: How can we begin discussing the complexities of violence in South Asian and other racialized communities? What are some ways to do this without reinscribing colonialist assumptions that violence lives in racialized cultures? Indeed how do we talk about violence within and with our communities outside of the parameters of dominant discourse? How do we demand accountability for gendered violence within our communities without serving the interests of institutional racism, economic exploitation, Islamophobia and hetero-national imperialism”?

Submissions are welcome from academics, community workers and activists from perspectives from sociology, critical criminology, education, gender studies, law, social work, cultural studies, communication and social psychology.

Suggested topics may include but are not limited to:

Popular media, critiques and questions
Grassroots movements to address violence
The “Honour” crimes industry
Sexual and bodily rights
Community conversations, healing, resiliency
The Construction of girlhood
Counseling frameworks and supports
Experiences in newcomer and/or racialized communities
State interventions and policies i.e. immigration
Role of institutions i.e. education and social services

The Editors are also planning to hold a symposium, inviting contributors to present their papers to “critique and share some of the work that is currently happening in the Canadian context”.

Deadline for abstracts: August 10, 2012. For more information, visit the IFLS website.

Call for papers: Intercultural counselling & education in the global world

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

The Centre for Intercultural Studies, University of Verona and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Toronto, in cooperation with NAME will be hosting an international conference on Intercultural Counselling and Education in the Global World in Verona, April 18-21, 2013.

From the (US-based) National Association for Multicultural Education listserv:

The Verona Conference will provide a unique opportunity for teachers, educators, counsellors and psychotherapists from Europe, US, Canada and other countries, facing issues of diversity, plurality and multiculturalism, to meet and share research findings and practical experiences. The conference will be bilingual – English and Italian.

Abstracts for papers, posters and workshop sessions are welcome. Conference themes include:

Integrating counselling and psychotherapy approaches into inter- and multicultural therapy

Integrating traditional healing and spirituality into counselling and psychotherapy

Diversity issues in therapy: Gender, race, class, sexual orientations, disAbility, age and religion

Cross-cultural supervision and research in counselling

Intercultural and multicultural education

Intercultural competence

Democracy, citizenship, equity and student engagement

Cooperative learning.

Deadline for submissions is Nov 1, 2012. For more information, please visit the conference website.

Parenting and discipline across cultures

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

From the CERIS (Centre of Excellence in Research in Immigration and Settlement) website, a post about parenting across cultures, as discussed in a television show, featuring CERIS Director Dr. Mehru Ali on parenting and discipline across cultures):

“Ali talked to TVO Parents about the cultural aspect of parenting and discipline in a Canadian context. In an expert panel to introduce a new TVO series The Slap, Dr. Ali shared her perspective and research on parenting and the situation that newcomers find themselves in a new society with potentially different norms. She emphasized that cultural norms greatly differ among groups and that we must consider the diversity of parents before judging one type of discipline over another”.

Ali comes in at about six minutes into the video. She addresses the discipline issue of hitting children. Increasingly, physically hitting a child is becoming unacceptable but Ali says we need to “consider” different parenting styles. Ali wavers on whether physical force is ever warranted but says the key principle is to keep the child protected.  My question is how do we reconcile types of discipline, though, with Canadian norms and laws? The host of the show cites that about 20 countries have banned corporal punishment. Canada, as a signatory to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and Article 19 (see below), have a legal obligation to protect children from physical violence, whether it’s from a parent or not.

Article 1. States Parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child.”

What’s next for immigrantchildren.ca?

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

immigrantchildren.ca wants to know what you want to know!

Please take our very short poll on the future of immigrantchildren.ca.

Thank you for your participation. It is greatly appreciated!