Archive for the ‘Call for papers’ Category

C4P 2016 National Metropolis Conference, Toronto

Friday, September 11th, 2015

A Call for proposals has been released for the 18th National Metropolis Conference, to be held in Toronto, Canada from March 3 to the 5th.

This year’s theme is Getting results: Migration, opportunities and good governance. From the conference website:

The 2016 National Metropolis Conference will focus on future immigration trends and policies and the challenges and opportunities that they create for Canadian society. The conference will include four plenary panels with distinguished speakers and workshop and round table sessions on a wide variety of topics related to immigration and diversity. We anticipate several hundred participants from Canada and abroad.

You can learn more about the conference and submit your proposal online at the conference website.

Call for papers: Children and migration in Africa and the African diaspora, European Social Science History conference

Friday, March 29th, 2013

From the H-Childhood Listserv:

“Call for panelists: Children and migration in African and the African diaspora at the European Social Science History conference, April 23-26, 2014.

“Following a successful interdisciplinary workshop on children and migration in Africa, held at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London in 2012, we invite abstracts for papers that explore this theme further. We particularly welcome papers that will expand the georgraphical scope of the panel into the African diasporas and that emphasize the experience of children themselves.

“While African children are heavily involved in migration, they remain obscure in grey and scholarly literatures dominated by the male labour migratory model. Furthermore, work on young migrants often conflates the social categories of ‘child’ and ‘youth’ and children themselves are divided into the binary states of agents or victims. Although recent scholarships on children and migration in Africa has acknowledged the importance of African children as discrete agents in migratory processes, analytical shortcomings remain.

“Papers could address, but are not limited to, the following issues:

family structures

patterns of fosterage

child circulation between Africa, Europe and the Americas

the role of education

child labour

religion and ritual

cultural exchange and conceptions of place and ‘home’”.

Interested scholars should send us an abstract in English (250 words max) and a short bio (200 words max) by April 15, 2013 to: Marie Rodet mr28@soas.ac.uk, Jack Lord jl79@soas.ac.uk, or Elodie Razy elodie.razy@ulg.ac.be.

Multicultural toys exhibit and conference, University of Greenwich

Saturday, March 23rd, 2013

The Centre for the Study of Play and Recreation, University of Greenwich and the Pollock Toy Museum Trust will host an exhibit and conference of multicultural toys and have issued a Call for Proposals.

From the H-CHILDHOOD Listserv:

“Toys have existed throughout human history in a few basic formats, while children have always created their own playthings. For centuries, craftsmen have created objects for children, which were available for purchase in places such as India and China before they were in Europe. Yet despite contemporary political espousal of innovation and entrepreneurship, the range of toys for sale in mainstream consumer outlets rarely reflects the cultural diversity of 21C Britain.

Globalization is usually understood as the dominance of particular brands rather than as an opportunity for diversification and dissemination of local materials.

June 3-8th, Exhibition at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery, University of Greenwich

June 8th, Conference

Following the success of previous multi-disciplinary conferences, we invite papers and short contributions from anyone interested in this area, including academics, post-graduate students, professionals working with children, and representatives of the toy industry.

Possible topics include:

Types of toys: balls, dolls, wheeled objected, construction toys, ‘small-world’ toys

Natural objects as playthings and the games they inspire(d)

Children’s experiences of toys, either contemporary or retrospective

Manufacture of toys and toy industries

Toys as training: the relationship between toys and social needs.

Please send a short summary of your proposed topic (no more than 250 words) to Mary Clare Martin at playandrecreation@gre.ac.uk. First deadline: March 31st, 2nd deadline, April 15th”.

Call for papers ~ Growing up global: Childhoods in a transnational context

Friday, October 26th, 2012

Announcing a joint session of the Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCY) and the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) to be held at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC June 1-8, 2013.

From the call for papers:

“As people and institutions connect across the borders of nation-states, children are invariably part of the processes of transnationalism. Yet their presence has largely been ignored by much of the scholarship on transnationalism. While they may lack the abilities to fully articulate and engage with the social, political, and economic forces behind transnational movement and circulation, young people are just as affected by – and central to – these global currents. Thinking about childhood in a transnational context requires a greater awareness of how contemporary global culture is creating a unique experience of childhood itself, both of childhood, and for children themselves.

“The purpose of this panel is to put children and childhood at the center of discussions concerning transnationalism. We seek papers that investigate the ways in which ‘the child’ both impacts and is impacted by circulation across global borders. We encourage research that questions how children experience transnationality and how we understand the child and childhood in the context of nation states whose borders are not what they once were.

“Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

-researching children and childhoods in transnational contexts
-the experiences of children in the transnational context
-the relationships between global capital and the transnational child
-securitization and the transnational child
-children in transnational families
-cosmopolitanism and the transnational child
-transnational migration and the child”.

Deadline is November 1, 2012.

For more information, visit the ACCUTE C4P page.

Call for papers: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

The International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care is (from their website) “a multidisciplinary journal focusing on international migration. The journal’s focus includes coverage of labour migration, asylum seekers, refugees and undocumented migrants, with an emphasis on health and social care and mental health issues.

“The following themes are of particular interest to the journal:
- Health care of migrants and refugees
- Impact of displacement on health and social care needs
- Treatment of refugee children
- Impact of family separation
- Human trafficking
- Integration of migrants and refugees”.

Submissions should be sent to the Editor, Professor Charles Watters at charles.watters@rutgers.edu

Author Guidelines.

Call for papers: Honour/shame related violence in Canada

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Amina Jamal, Mandeep Kaur Mucina and Farrah Khan are planning a symposium and edited collection of (as posted on website of the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode Hall) “critical essays on “honour” related violence. The idea for this anthology emerged initially in reaction to the murder of Aqsa Parvez and the responses of various institution and communities. As other murders of young women come to light in Canada, such as Amandeep Atwal, Jassi Sidhu, Zainab, Sahar and Geeti Shafia, we find that there are limited spaces for us to mourn and reflect on the complexities of these murders.

“Often the reactions of mainstream society and the questions posed to us are the following: is violence endemic to South Asian communities? Do some religions condone “honour “based killings? Reacting to the death and to the responses, the following questions became a central focus for our work: How can we begin discussing the complexities of violence in South Asian and other racialized communities? What are some ways to do this without reinscribing colonialist assumptions that violence lives in racialized cultures? Indeed how do we talk about violence within and with our communities outside of the parameters of dominant discourse? How do we demand accountability for gendered violence within our communities without serving the interests of institutional racism, economic exploitation, Islamophobia and hetero-national imperialism”?

Submissions are welcome from academics, community workers and activists from perspectives from sociology, critical criminology, education, gender studies, law, social work, cultural studies, communication and social psychology.

Suggested topics may include but are not limited to:

Popular media, critiques and questions
Grassroots movements to address violence
The “Honour” crimes industry
Sexual and bodily rights
Community conversations, healing, resiliency
The Construction of girlhood
Counseling frameworks and supports
Experiences in newcomer and/or racialized communities
State interventions and policies i.e. immigration
Role of institutions i.e. education and social services

The Editors are also planning to hold a symposium, inviting contributors to present their papers to “critique and share some of the work that is currently happening in the Canadian context”.

Deadline for abstracts: August 10, 2012. For more information, visit the IFLS website.

Call for papers: Intercultural counselling & education in the global world

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

The Centre for Intercultural Studies, University of Verona and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Toronto, in cooperation with NAME will be hosting an international conference on Intercultural Counselling and Education in the Global World in Verona, April 18-21, 2013.

From the (US-based) National Association for Multicultural Education listserv:

The Verona Conference will provide a unique opportunity for teachers, educators, counsellors and psychotherapists from Europe, US, Canada and other countries, facing issues of diversity, plurality and multiculturalism, to meet and share research findings and practical experiences. The conference will be bilingual – English and Italian.

Abstracts for papers, posters and workshop sessions are welcome. Conference themes include:

Integrating counselling and psychotherapy approaches into inter- and multicultural therapy

Integrating traditional healing and spirituality into counselling and psychotherapy

Diversity issues in therapy: Gender, race, class, sexual orientations, disAbility, age and religion

Cross-cultural supervision and research in counselling

Intercultural and multicultural education

Intercultural competence

Democracy, citizenship, equity and student engagement

Cooperative learning.

Deadline for submissions is Nov 1, 2012. For more information, please visit the conference website.

Call for papers: Children and war

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Call for Papers: “Children and War: Past and Present”. 2nd international and multidisciplinary conference, July 10-12, 2013 at the University of Salzburg, Austria. Organized by the University of Salzburg and the University of Wolverhampton, in association with the United Nations Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict.

From the Forced Migration listserv:

“This conference is planned as a follow-up to the first conference, which took place at the University of Salzburg in 2010. It will continue to build on areas previously investigated, and also open up new fields of academic enquiry.

“All research proposals which focus on a topic and theme related to ‘Children and War’ are welcome, ranging from the experience of war, flight, displacement and resettlement, to relief, rehabilitation and reintegration work, gender issues, persecution, trafficking, sexual violence, trauma and amnesia, the trans-generational impact of persecution, individual and collective memory, educational issues, films and documentaries, artistic and literary approaches, remembrance and memorials, and questions of theory and methodology. Specific conference themes anticipated are:
- Children as victims, witnesses and participants in armed conflict
- Holocaust, genocide and forced labour
- Deportation and displacement, refugees and asylum seekers
- War crimes, trials and human rights

“A special focus will be on the ‘Changing nature of armed conflict and its impact on children’. In the past two decades, UN reports, including the 1996 study by Graça Machel and its 10-year review, noted with concern that the character and tactics of armed conflict are changing, creating new and unprecedented threats to children. Characteristics of the changing nature of warfare include the blurring of lines between military and civilian targets, the use of new technologies and the absence of clear battlefields and identifiable opponents. Extensive research is needed to deal with challenges emerging from this context, including the use of children as suicide bombers, the deliberate targeting of traditional safe havens such as schools and hospitals, the detention and prosecution of children associated with armed groups, and terrorism and the use of counter-terrorism measures (for more information, please see the ‘Note by OSRSG-CAAC’).

“Please send an abstract of 200-250 words, together with biographical background information of 50-100 words by *31 July 2012* to: J.D.Steinert@wlv.ac.uk. All proposals are subject to a review process. Successful candidates will be informed in October 2012 and will be asked to send in their papers by the end of April 2013 for distribution among conference participants on a CD. Further information will be made available in due time. The organizers intend to publish a selection of conference papers”.

For more information, please contact J.D.Steinert@wlv.ac.uk.

Update: On new shores immigrant children conference

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

The deadline for papers has been extended to March 30th for Dr. Susan Chuang’s fifth On New Shores conference. It will be held October 25-26 in Toronto.

From the call for papers: “The goal of the conference is to bring together various stakeholders (academia, community, and governmental sectors) to collectively examine and discuss the various forms of social support (informal, formal) by families, communities, and governmental agencies to promote subjective and family well-being for immigrant and refugee children, youth, and families. Discussions of social capital and protective factors will also be addressed. Researchers from various disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology, social work, education, anthropology, business) are welcomed. Community service providers and governmental agencies are encouraged to present work on research, effective programs, social issues, and challenges.

“Leading scholars from various disciplines will be presenting, including: Robert Bradley, Xinyin Chen, Catherine Costigan, David Este, Jo Ann Farver, Uwe Gielen, William Jankowiak, Deborah Johnson, Jay Mancini, Luis Moll, Felix Neto, Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, Vappu Tyyska, Fons van de Vijver and more! National and local organizations will also be presenting!”

Submission deadline is March 30th. All proposals must be submitted to Dr. Susan S. Chuang by email (schuang@uoguelph.ca), accompanied by a ons submission form”.

Call for papers: ‘On New Shores’ immigrant children conference

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Dr. Susan Chuang has announced the fifth On New Shores conference. It will be held October 25-26 in Toronto.

From the call for papers: “The goal of the conference is to bring together various stakeholders (academia, community, and governmental sectors) to collectively examine and discuss the various forms of social support (informal, formal) by families, communities, and governmental agencies to promote subjective and family well-being for immigrant and refugee children, youth, and families. Discussions of social capital and protective factors will also be addressed. Researchers from various disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology, social work, education, anthropology, business) are welcomed. Community service providers and governmental agencies are encouraged to present work on research, effective programs, social issues, and challenges.

“Leading scholars from various disciplines will be presenting, including: Robert Bradley, Xinyin Chen, David Este, Jo Ann Farver, Uwe Gielen, Donald Hernandez, Benson Honig, William Jankowiak, Deborah Johnson, Jay Mancini, Luis Moll, Felix Neto, Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, Vappu Tyyska, Fons van de Vijer…and more! National and local organizations will also be presenting!

“Options for presentation include papers and posters.

“We cordially invite you to submit a proposal! Submission deadline is March 15th. All proposals must be submitted to Dr. Susan S. Chuang by email (schuang@uoguelph.ca), accompanied by a ons submission form”.

Call for papers: Children and Childhood Network, Histories of Capitalism

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Call for papers, as posted on the H-CHILDHOOD&H=H-NET.MSU.EDU listserv, for the Children and Childhood Network of the Social Science History Association:

“We invite you to participate in the 37th annual meeting of the Social Science History Association (SSHA) by submitting a paper or session proposal to the Children and Childhood Network of the SSHA. The conference will take place November 1-4, 2012 in Vancouver, British Columbia. For more information on the conference as well as the general call for proposals, please refer to the SSHA website. The association particularly emphasizes interdisciplinary and transnational research, and the annual meeting provides a very supportive environment in which to present new work. The theme of the 2012 conference is Histories of Capitalism, though papers related to the conference location of Vancouver or other aspects of social science history are also welcome.

“Please see a preliminary list below of session ideas generated at last year’s C & C network meeting. Complete panels must include at least 4 papers and presenters from more than one academic institution. Other formats, including roundtable discussions and book sessions, are also possible. Proposals can be submitted by means of a web conference management system.

“If you have any questions, please contact either of the Children and Childhood network co-chairs: Birgitte Søland: soland.1@osu.edu Emily Bruce: bruce088@umn.edu

“Possible panels suggested at the 2011 C&C network meeting:

• youth, parents, and the market (contact Emily Bruce, bruce088@umn.edu)

• children’s social capital

• indigeneity and youth

• globalization of child labor

• trafficking

• surrogacy/reproductive technologies

• child placement in histories of capitalism

• disability, the medicalization of childhood

• children and consumerism

• international adoption

• roundtable on pedagogy: teaching the history of childhood

• queer childhoods

The deadline for full panel or individual paper proposals is March 1, 2012″.

Anthropology of Childhood and Children

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

From the H-CHILDHOOD@H-NET.MSU.EDU listserv, announcement of AnthropoChildren: Perspectives ethnographiques sur les enfants & l’enfance / Ethnographic Perspectives in Children & Childhood:

AnthropoChildren is an online international review edited at the University of Liège (Belgium). The Review publishes original articles in the area of Social and Cultural Anthropology of Children & Childhood. It subscribes to voluntary open access in an attempt to foster debate between academics, students and professionals worldwide. The importance of long-term fieldwork and participant observation as a scientific process and a singular relation in the construction of subject matter is a starting point for addressing questions and issues on the development of the discipline. However, even if Anthropology of Children & Childhood is a field unto itself, there is no reason to separate it from the other areas within general anthropology (kinship, religion, economics, politics, etc.).

“The Review aims to bring together various academic traditions so that they may enlighten each other on the basis of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in different social categories and groups, communities, institutions, and societies around the world. Articles will provide knowledge on Children worlds. It is expected that papers will critically enhance theoretical thought and the dialogue between anthropologists of Children & Childhood and a larger audience. Reflections on scientific, social and political issues in Anthropology of Children & Childhood are thus welcome.

“The Review is published twice yearly in both French and English. The criteria for acceptance and publication of submissions are originality, quality of ethnographic descriptions and data, contribution to the field of Anthropology of Children & Childhood, theoretical and methodological rigor, analytical capacity, relevance of the bibliography, and ability to foster the dialogue between actors and institutions”.

The first Issue is “Anthropology of Childhood and Children Worldwide“.