Making integration work: Young people with migrant parents

Young People with Migrant Parents
Making Integration Work, volume 4
The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

“The OECD series Making Integration Work summarises, in a non-technical way, the main issues surrounding the integration of immigrants and their children into their host countries. Each volume presents concrete policy lessons for its theme, along with supporting examples of good practices and comparisons of the migrant integration policy frameworks in different OECD countries. This fourth volume explores the integration of young people with migrant parents, a diverse and growing cohort of youth in the OECD area.”

Sister2Sister Mentoring program by Newcomer Women’s Services Toronto

Newcomer Women’s Services Toronto has issued a call for immigrant women of colour to serve as mentors to work with other newcomer women against violence against women. in their Sister2Sister program.

From a recent report, NWST says “Sister2Sister is a leadership development program that is nurturing immigrant women to become advocates and peer supports in their communities for victims of gender violence and domestic abuse”.

Deadline is February 16th.

For more information, visit their site and check out their latest impact report

Dr. Judith Bernhard returns to Ryerson University

Great news for Ryerson University’s School of Early Childhood Studies. Dr. Judith Bernhard is returning!

Dr. Bernhard (PhD, University of Toronto) is a tenured full professor with over 25 years of teaching and research experience in the areas of diversity, inclusion, and settlement of newcomer children and families in early childhood settings. She is affiliated with Ryerson’s MA program in Immigration and Settlement Studies.

Dr. Bernhard’s recent research interests are migrant and refugee families with precarious legal status and Latinx in the educational system.

Dr. Bernhard’s book Stand Together or Fall Apart: Professionals Working with Immigrant Families is an excellent resource for practitioners who take a strengths-based approach to working with newcomer families and children.

You can follow Dr. Bernhard on Twitter here.

CMAS | Care for Newcomer Children launches a parenting webpage

CMAS | Care for Newcomer Children * is a federally funded program that provides supports, resources, and helps organizations, to provide culturally appropriate child care for newcomer families participating in the Language Instruction for Newcomers in Canada program.

They have just launched a section on Parenting in their website. The Parenting pages provide useful information and resources, including multilingual resources in:

Parenting ~ information to help newcomer families adjust to parenting in Canada, including multilingual resources covering general parenting practices

Child development ~ information, resources and ideas to encourage the cognitive, social, emotional, and language development of children

Health and safety ~ information on nutrition, immunizations, mental health, physical activity guidelines, and product recall information

School readiness ~ information on how to support a smooth transition to the school system.

*CMAS (formerly known as Childminding Advisory and Support Services) is  funded through Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and was founded in 2000.  More recently, it supports and promotes the care for newcomer children model. “Childminding” is no longer used.

Yo Cuento: Latin American immigrant children tell their stories

How (well) do immigrant children adjust to new shores? Researcher Monica Valencia, Ryerson University, asked a group of children to answer the question through drawings.

She found that there were 4 themes in the children’s drawings:

  1. Sadness (leaving behind family, friends, neighbourhood)
  2. Anxiety (unfamiliar, sometimes hostile environment)
  3. Frustration (so much new to learn! Language, customs)
  4. Gratitude for friendship (peer support critical to happy integration).

Read more about this research in a 2014 article written by The Toronto Star’s immigration reporter, Nicholas Keung,

See more immigration related stories by Keung here.

Documentary in development: The Deportation of innocence

The Deportation of Innocence tells the story of four children and their immigrant families in the United States as they come to terms with deportation and the long lasting effects this has had on their lives and answers the question, what happens to children after their parents are deported.

The documentary includes testimonies from lawyers, social workers, academics and who have firsthand knowledge and insight into the hardship of family separation and the challenges of reunification.

The documentary is complete, but producers have turned to crowd-funding to get this documentary out.

Kids in Doug Saunders’ Arrival City ~ The CityBuilder 2015 BookClub

Are you participating in the online CityBuilder BookClub about Doug SaundersArrival City? Interested in migrant child and family issues? Here’s the pages where children/children’s issues are mentioned, in the First Vintage Books paperback edition, April 2012 (ISBN: 978-0-307-38856-8):

child care ~ 16, 52, 110, 227, 238, 284, 405

child labor ~ 142, 153, 154

second generation ~ 33-34, 35, 51, 55, 68-69, 82, 127, 168, 172, 173, 184, 268-69, 272, 273, 277-78, 279, 284, 285, 290-92, 293, 196-97, 301, 320

The book club starts Jan 13th. Happy reading!

 

 

C4P: Immigrant families over the life course

From the Family Science Review website, a call for papers for an upcoming special issue on immigrant families over the life course.

“Family Science Review is inviting manuscripts for a special issue on Immigrant Families over the Life Course. The goal of this issue is to examine immigrant families’ dynamics across generations and over time, in the context of global migration and transnationalism.

“For this issue, we seek research-based manuscripts that explore strengths and challenges of immigrant families as related to acculturation, family adaptation, changes in intergenerational relationships, maintenance/loss of ethnic culture and heritage language, development of ethnic identity, and other issues relevant to immigrant families. We welcome manuscripts that explore the multidimensional experience of immigration among diverse immigrant families (e.g., different countries of origin, migration experiences, socioeconomic characteristics, length of residency in the host country, resources and vulnerabilities), from the perspective of family science. Manuscripts related to the teaching of immigration and families are also welcome.

“Manuscripts should be written in APA style and exemplify the highest quality of writing. Manuscripts should be no more than 30 pages. Authors are advised to check the Family Science Review website for information on manuscripts submission. There is a $20 submission fee for each manuscript which must be received prior to entering the paper and sending it out for review.  Please check the FSR website for details”.

Guest Editors: Olena Nesteruk, Montclair State University at nesteruko@mail.montclair.edu and Beckie Adams, Ball State University at badams@bsu.edu.

Submission Deadline: February 27, 2015

Manuscripts should be written in Word and be sent electronically to nesteruko@mail.montclair.edu no later than February 27, 2015.

Parenting and discipline across cultures

From the CERIS (Centre of Excellence in Research in Immigration and Settlement) website, a post about parenting across cultures, as discussed in a television show, featuring CERIS Director Dr. Mehru Ali on parenting and discipline across cultures):

“Ali talked to TVO Parents about the cultural aspect of parenting and discipline in a Canadian context. In an expert panel to introduce a new TVO series The Slap, Dr. Ali shared her perspective and research on parenting and the situation that newcomers find themselves in a new society with potentially different norms. She emphasized that cultural norms greatly differ among groups and that we must consider the diversity of parents before judging one type of discipline over another”.

Ali comes in at about six minutes into the video. She addresses the discipline issue of hitting children. Increasingly, physically hitting a child is becoming unacceptable but Ali says we need to “consider” different parenting styles. Ali wavers on whether physical force is ever warranted but says the key principle is to keep the child protected.  My question is how do we reconcile types of discipline, though, with Canadian norms and laws? The host of the show cites that about 20 countries have banned corporal punishment. Canada, as a signatory to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and Article 19 (see below), have a legal obligation to protect children from physical violence, whether it’s from a parent or not.

Article 1. States Parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child.”